Camp Blog | Emagination Computer Camps

Preparing Parents for Camp

preparing parents

For most families, sending their child to camp will be a wonderful experience for both the camper and the parents, but for many parents this time away from their child will also be riddled with concerns about everything from if they are brushing their teeth to how they are being treated by the other campers to the care and supervision that they are receiving from staff. While most parents experience these and other concerns, some parents struggle more than others to adjust to the separation from their child. This increasingly common experience for parents has been coined “kidsickness” and for some families, it is even more difficult for parents to adjust to the weeks their child spends at camp than it is for the camper.

The American Camp Association has listed 5 tips that I think benefit all families as they prepare to send their child to camp:

Focus on the positive
“Focus on what is so positive about the experience children will have at camp – the opportunity to have fun while developing social skills, building character and self-respect, spending time in nature, and participating in a community based on caring, fairness, citizenship, and trust.” – Peg L. Smith, ACA CEO

Remember that separation is natural and necessary
“Remember your baby’s first crawl, the first time your child stepped onto a school bus, and his or her first overnight with a friend or relative. These memories are all important developmental phases you and your child successfully navigated. Each successful separation gives your child confidence for the next challenge. Recognize and expect success.” – Peg L. Smith, ACA CEO

You’ve taught them well
“Trust that the connection you have with your child doesn’t break or evaporate when you are physically apart. Everything you have taught them is there. Having anxiety or sadness about seeing them off is entirely reasonable and understandable. How can you love your kids and not have some feelings like these? Yet, one of the most valuable lessons we as adults can model for our children is that even in the face of our feelings, no matter how strong, we do what is best.” – Bob Ditter, family therapist

This is vital preparation
“As our children prepare to eventually leave home permanently, the camp experience will instill independence through summers of fun while helping them acquire skills and assets that will serve them throughout their lives.” – Peg L. Smith, ACA CEO

Share what you are feeling
“Talk with a friend or spouse. What are you feeling? What was the reason for sending your child to camp in the first place? Having an outside perspective can help us look more evenly at our own.” – Bob Ditter, family therapist

STEM Camp for Kids and Teens Ready to Start 14th Season in Atlanta

Emagination Computer Camps, a national operator of summer technology camps, prepares to open its 2017 summer camp season at Mercer University for kids and teens ages 8 – 17, June 4th.

Atlanta, Georgia – Parents and grandparents who are looking for a fun and educational summer camp experience in the greater Atlanta area for their children and grandchildren can register for the 2017 summer camp season at Emagination Computer Camps, hosted at Mercer University which begins its first session June 4.

Emagination, which is in its 14th year of operation in Atlanta and 35th year overall, delivers a program which balances high quality technology learning with the activities and life-long benefits of a traditional summer camp.

During each two-week camp session, campers choose three technology workshops from the 26 the camp offers, including new workshops like 3D Printing, Augmented Reality, and Motion Graphics Programming.

“Emagination is unique compared to other technology camps because we allow our campers to choose more than one subject to study during a session,” said Craig Whiting, owner of Emagination Computer Camps. “If they want to study virtual reality, robotics, and game design, they don’t have to go to three different camps or attend three different sessions, they can do it all here.”

Each camper also takes a recreation workshop which gets the campers outdoors to play field games like capture-the-flag, dodgeball, or ultimate frisbee. Campers also have the option to go swimming. Additional recreational options are available after lunch and during the camp’s evening program.

“Structured and unstructured playtime, as well as socialization, are key components to healthy childhood development which you can’t get sitting in front of a computer,” said Whiting. “That’s why we incorporate it so heavily into our program; we want to offer the most well-rounded summer camp experience that we can.”

Emagination also offers two specialty programs for teenagers. In Emagination Programming Camp, teens 13 – 17 learn how to program with C#, the world’s most popular programming language for creating Windows applications. This two-week STEM program is balanced with daily recreation and a full evening program for overnight campers.

In Emagination Game Design Camp, teens 15 – 1 experience what it’s like to work in the video game development industry. They join a team to build a playable 3D game, tour a game design studio, and learn from guest speakers. This two-week overnight only STEM program is an immersive experience, but balanced with plenty of time for daily activities and recreation. Emagination Game Design is hosted at Georgia Tech.

About Emagination Computer Camps at Mercer University
Mercer University’s beautiful Atlanta campus is situated on 200 impeccably maintained park-like acres in northeast Atlanta. Expansive outdoor fields, an indoor pool and gymnasium, make Mercer an ideal location for summer camp in Georgia and Atlanta day camps. Overnight camp participants are grouped by age and gender and live with counselors in apartment-style housing. All technology camp workshops are held in one centrally located academic building.

About Emagination Computer Camps
For more than 30 years, Emagination has been the perfect summer camp for kids around the world who love technology. Founded in Connecticut in 1982, Emagination now operates technology camps on college campuses near Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, Atlanta, and in Fairfield, Connecticut. The camp’s mission is to educate, entertain, and help develop healthy kids and teens by balancing technology learning with the activities and benefits of a traditional summer camp experience.

Emagination Computer Camps Offers 10 Exciting New Tech Workshops

Emagination Computer Camps, a national operator of summer technology camps, is adding ten exciting new workshops to its 2017 summer camp season for kids and teens aged 8 – 17.

Some of the new workshops include: Augmented Reality, 3D Printing, Motion Graphics Programming, and Minecraft Engineering.

In total, Emagination offers 26 technology workshops covering a variety of STEM related activities, such as creating digital media, video game design, computer programming, and engineering. During each two-week camp session, campers choose three technology workshops plus a recreation activity.

For a complete listing of Emagination’s new technology workshops, click here

Emagination’s Computer Camp program blends technology learning with fun summer camp activities such as a Talent Show, a day of games on Saturday, and an evening program of recreation and technology to create a well-rounded summer camp experience.

Offered in five locations, near Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago, Atlanta, and in Fairfield, Connecticut, boys and girls from around the country and many foreign countries have trusted Emagination for a diverse summer camp experience since 1982.

Emagination also offers two specialty STEM programs for teenagers, Emagination Programming Camp and Emagination Game Design.

Offered at all five locations, Emagination Programming Camp, is a program for teens ages 13 – 17 who have an interest in learning to code in C#, the most popular programming language for creating Windows applications.

In this two-week program, campers will learn the basics of programming in C# and how it is used by today’s developers to bring seamless integration into desktop and web applications. The program is balanced with plenty of time for traditional camp activities including sports and swimming.

Emagination Game Design, is an immersive STEM program for teens ages 15 – 18 who have an interest in learning how video games are designed and developed.

Teens learn key technical and creative components of video game design, including level design and function, creation of 3D characters, lighting, sound effects, and programming. Working in teams, they build a playable video game that is presented to a panel of industry experts on the last day of camp. The program also includes a tour of a professional game design studio and guest speakers who come to campus.

Emagination Computer Camps Offers Alternative to Traditional Technology Camps

Emagination Computer Camps, a national operator of summer technology camps for children since 1982, offers summer programs which blend fun technology learning with the life-long benefits of a traditional summer camp.

“Over the past several years, there has been an incredible rise in the interest in summer STEM learning opportunities,” said Craig Whiting, president of Emagination. “At Emagination, we’ve always believed in balancing educational time in front of a computer and the developmental benefits which come from non-technology, interpersonal activities.”

There are many aspects to Emagination’s program which differentiates it from other technology camps. Over a two-week camp session, each camper takes four workshops; three are technology workshops, which they choose from a selection of 26 that Emagination offers, and one is a recreation workshop.

Campers are organized into camper groups, similar to a traditional camp’s cabin groups, to foster socialization and building friendships through small group activities.

Structured and unstructured playtime is incorporated throughout the campers’ day with the camp’s “Refresh Time,” an hour after lunch to hang out with friends, play games, or socialize before afternoon workshops, and “Evening Program,” where campers choose from a selection of activities driven by camper interests.

The Saturday in the middle of the session is filled with fun outdoor games and activities such as a slip ‘n slide, color run, Human Pac-Man, and many more. A BBQ, movie night, and Local Area Network (LAN) gaming tournament are all part of the camp’s “Super Saturday.”

Returning high school-aged campers can participate in the camp’s Teen Leadership Program, which gives them the opportunity to learn leadership and life-skills and to put those skills into action by assisting staff both in the classroom and in outdoor activities.

“Our mission is to ‘educate, entertain, and help develop healthy kids,'” said Whiting, “and we believe we deliver on that mission with our programs.”

Emagination Computer Camps is offered at Boston College in Newton, Massachusetts, Fairfield University in Fairfield, Connecticut, Rosemont College in Rosemont/Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, Mercer University in Atlanta, Georgia, and Lake Forest College in Lake Forest, Illinois.

Emagination also offers two specialty STEM programs for teenagers, Emagination Programming Camp and Emagination Game Design Camp.

In Emagination Programming Camp, teens ages 13 – 17 learn how to program with C# – the world’s most popular programming language for creating Windows applications. This two-week day or overnight STEM program is balanced with daily recreation and a full evening program for overnight campers.

In Emagination Game Design Camp, teens 15 – 18 experience what it’s like to work in the video game development industry. They join a team to build a playable 3D game, tour a game design studio, and learn from guest speakers. This two-week overnight only STEM program is an immersive experience, but balanced with plenty of time for daily outdoor activities and recreation.

10 Tips for Keeping Your Kids Safe on Social Media

There’s no doubt that we live in a digital world and as our children become more and more tech savvy in this digital age, it’s important that parents maintain a vigilant sense of security when it comes to our children’s online presence.

While having the ability to be instantaneously connected to the world around you and to share your experiences at your fingertips has several benefits, it also opens up a whole new world of risks. From predators to cyberbullies, a child’s misuse of a social network can have serious consequences.

If your child is asking to use, or is already using social media, check out these 10 tips for keeping them safe on social media.

Social Media Safety

1. Educate yourself about social media
Do you remember when the only big social media sites were Facebook and Myspace? That’s not the case anymore. As a parent, it’s important to familiarize yourself with what sites are out there and which are appropriate for your child. Here are some of the most popular social apps and sites for kids and teens:

2. Establish an age limit for your child to start using social media
While you’re familiarizing yourself with what social media sites are out there, you should take a look at what the required minimum age is for each site. Most social media sites require users to be 13 or older to create an account without their parents’ permission, according to the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA).

3. Regularly check your child’s privacy settings.
Once your child has set up a social media account, it’s important to remain vigilant about keeping their privacy settings updated. Social Media sites are continually adding security settings to ensure that maximum protection is available, but oftentimes they need to be updated manually by the user.

4. Keep your child’s profile private.
Most social media sites give you the option to make your account private. This means that only people who your child has friended will be able to see the content on their profile. This is an important step to take in order to keep their content private and away from people who may misuse it.

5. Make sure they’re not posting personal details, including phone numbers, address, or check-ins.
Social media has become such a normal part of people’s lives that it’s not uncommon for people to share information about themselves that shouldn’t be shared. It’s important that your child understands what kinds of information shouldn’t be shared and why.

6. Don’t allow them to post photos or videos which jeopardize their safety or character.
While most people post pictures and videos with the best intentions, it’s easy for things to be taken the wrong way or out of context and when everyone is online, the wrong message can have long-lasting consequences. Talk to your kids about this and make sure they understand to only post pictures and videos that present themselves and others in a positive light.

7. Make sure they choose a strong password.
“1, 2, 3, 4, 5? That’s amazing! I’ve got the same combination on my luggage!”

The password scene from the 1987 comedy Spaceballs was funny back then and it’s still funny today because the implications are the same. Would you really use a password as simple as 1,2,3,4,5 to safeguard something important? No, of course you wouldn’t and you should get your kids into the habit as well.

8. Never allow them to accept friend requests from people they don’t know.
This may be self-explanatory, but there are a lot of people out there who use social media to stalk people and steal their information to cause harm. It’s always best practice to only accept friend requests from people your child knows such as their friends and family.

9. Set guidelines/rules for their social media use.
Establishing rules or guidelines from the start is a great way to instill positive habits for your child on social media. However, you don’t want to set up rules which are too strict or else you run the risk of your child actively and secretly trying to break them. Try to make rules that empower your child to make good decisions on their own.

10. Keep an open dialogue with your child.
You can’t monitor your child’s social media activity 24/7, so maintaining a strong line of communication is important to understand what’s going on with your child online. Ask them to inform you whenever they receive messages or invites from strangers. Talk to them about the consequences of misusing social media. Ask them to tell you if someone is teasing or harassing them as those could be signs of cyber-bullying.

If you’re interested in learning more about social media safety, check out the Center on Media and Child Health and kids.gov – both are excellent resources for parents!

Emagination Computer Camps Returning to Mercer University’s Atlanta Campus

Emagination Computer Camps, a national operator of summer technology camps, is returning its Atlanta, Georgia summer camp to Mercer University’s Atlanta Campus for the 2017 summer season.

“We’ve had a long and successful relationship with Mercer in Atlanta and we’re happy to be going back for the 2017 summer season,” said Craig Whiting, President of Emagination. “Mercer’s Atlanta campus is perfect for our tech camps with modern classrooms and housing and plenty of outdoor and indoor space for recreation and swimming.”

At Mercer, Emagination will operate its Computer Camp program for children ages 8 – 17 as well as its Emagination Game Design for teens ages 15 – 18 and Programming camps for teens ages 13 – 17.

Emagination’s Computer Camp program blends technology learning with fun summer camp activities to create a well-rounded summer camp experience. Campers learn 21st century technology skills while also developing valuable social and life skills through recreation workshops and traditional summer camp activities.

The computer camp offers more than 25 technology workshops including Virtual Reality, 3D Animation, Web Design, Video Game Design, Coding, Minecraft, Robotics, CAD, and more.

Campers come for two-week sessions as day or overnight campers. They choose three technology workshops plus a recreation activity. A Talent Show, a day of games on Saturday and an evening program of recreation and technology help create a well-rounded summer camp experience.

Emagination Game Design is an immersive STEM program for teens ages 15 – 18 who have an interest in learning how video games are designed and developed.

Teens learn key technical and creative components of video game design, including level design and function, the creation of 3D characters, lighting, sound effects, and programming. Working in teams, they build a playable video game that is presented to a panel of industry experts on the last day of camp. The program also includes a tour of a professional game design studio and guest speakers who come to campus.

Emagination Programming Camp is a STEM program for teens ages 13 – 17 who have an interest in learning to code in C#, the most popular programming language for creating Windows applications.

In this two-week program, campers will learn the basics of programming in C# and how it is used by today’s developers to bring seamless integration into desktop and web applications. The program is balanced with plenty of time for traditional camp activities including sports and swimming.

Emagination Computer Camps Expands Programming Camp for Teens to New Locations

Emagination Computer Camps, a national operator of summer technology camps for children, is expanding its Programming Camp to its Massachusetts, Illinois, and Georgia locations for the 2017 summer season.

The expansion comes after the program’s success in its inaugural 2016 season at Emagination’s Pennsylvania and Connecticut camps.

“We were very happy about the overwhelming success of Emagination Programming Camp in its first season and we’re excited to bring this great program to new locations,” said Craig Whiting, President of Emagination. “As at all our tech programs, the programming camp combines tech learning with a fun summer camp experience filled with recreation and opportunities for social development.”

Emagination Programming Camp is a 2-week STEM camp for teens ages 13 – 17 who are interested in learning how to program with C# – the world’s most popular programming language for creating Windows applications.

In addition to learning how to program with C#, campers will also engage in fun daily recreational activities as part of Emagination’s goal of providing the lifelong benefits of a traditional summer camp experience as well as fun technology learning – the cornerstone of the company’s mission to “educate, entertain, and help develop healthy kids.”

Emagination’s camps are located at Boston College in Newton, Massachusetts, Lake Forest College in Lake Forest, Illinois, Mercer University in Atlanta, Georgia, Rosemont College in Rosemont, Pennsylvania, and Fairfield University in Fairfield, Connecticut.

Each location also operates Emagination’s computer camp program for children ages 8 – 17.

Emagination’s Computer Camp program blends technology learning with fun summer camp activities to create a well-rounded summer camp experience. Campers learn 21st century technology skills while also developing valuable social and life skills through recreation workshops and traditional summer camp activities.

The computer camp offers more than 25 technology workshops including Virtual Reality, 3D Animation, Web Design, Video Game Design, Coding, Minecraft, Robotics, CAD, and more.

Campers come for two-week sessions as day or overnight campers. They choose three technology workshops plus a recreation activity. A Talent Show, a day of games on Saturday and an evening program of recreation and technology help create a well-rounded summer camp experience.

A Parents’ Guide to Minecraft

Minecraft is easily one of the most popular video games among children and it has been growing in popularity since its release in 2009. With that level of popularity, it’s not unreasonable for parents to have a few questions about what it is that they’re buying for their kids. I hope to answer several of those questions in this blog post by briefly going over the basics of this game in our Minecraft Guide.

What is Minecraft?

It’s a simple enough question, but one that requires a bit of a long winded response. On the surface, Minecraft doesn’t look like any other game out there on the mainstream market, which is always trying to one-up itself with the quality and realism of its graphics. Minecraft looks more like a 3D version of an 8-bit adventure game from the 1980’s than something that came out in the early 2000’s.

However, the graphics are not what drives the popularity of this game. Instead, unlike many games that are based around lengthy storylines or quick hack-and-slash multiplayer rounds, Minecraft is what is known as a sandbox game where the player is dropped in to a procedurally generated world where the player gathers resources, crafts tools, builds structures, and recreates the world in a way which is only limited by the player’s creativity.

Minecraft

That’s the beauty of Minecraft and what makes this simple looking game so popular with kids and adults (and one of the most popular workshops we offer at camp!). This game is centered around the player’s ability to imagine.

You want to build a house? Done. What about a castle? Done. Well, what about a scaled recreation of planet Earth, or a one-to-one scaled model of the country of Denmark, or an actual working computer? Done, done, and done.

Also, the studio behind the game is always adding new content to the game (for free!) which allows the player to continually create and play in new ways every time he/she plays.

Is this game’s content appropriate for my child?

This is a completely understandable question if you’re on the fence about whether or not you should buy this game for you child. To answer this question, I will first explain a little bit more about how Minecraft is played. Minecraft has two game modes which the player has the choice of playing, each with its own set of rules and challenges.

Survival

Survival is what I call the “basic” game mode. In survival mode, the player has to build their own tools, mine their own resources, and ultimately “survive” by foraging, farming, and crafting food supplies as well as building armor and weapons to fend of the nocturnal and cave dwelling zombies, skeletons, and creepers (a green monster packed with TNT that silently creeps up on players) that will inevitably attack them once the sun goes down.

Sounds scary right? Well, aside from a few moaning sounds from zombies and the surprise of the hissing a creeper makes after sneaking up on you, the game is not really designed to be scary. However, these sounds could be scary to a younger audience.

What about the violence? While a name like “survival” can sound like it would contain a lot of violent actions, the combat in this game is not gory or graphic in any way. The weapons that a player, and some of the monsters, use are limited to a sword or a bow and arrow. There are no guns or explosives (with the exception of TNT, which they can create for mining or building traps). When the player gets hit by an enemy, the screen quickly flashes red and the player gets pushed away from the monsters a little bit. If the player dies they can simply respawn and keep playing the game.

Combat is also completely optional in this game. A player can play without ever swinging a sword or launching an arrow.

Creative

If survival mode sounds too violent or scary for your child, you could consider Creative Mode instead. In this mode, the player has any and all resources available to them from the start so they don’t have to do any mining. This allows them to dive right in to the creative aspect of the game. Also, while in creative mode, the monsters will not attack the player, removing all aspects of violence from the game.

Multiplayer

Minecraft does support several different versions of multiplayer gameplay, both on a local area network or online. In multiplayer, your child will have the chance to play with friends or random other players on servers which have everything from free-play to player created mini games. While the Minecraft online community seems to be a friendly group of people, parents should always monitor their child’s online activity to make sure they are playing in a safe environment.

Is Minecraft Good for my child?

This is what it all comes down to, right? Sitting in front of a computer screen is obviously not healthy. However, unlike most video games, Minecraft does have some attributes to it that can be beneficial for your child.

Minecraft encourages several positive behaviors. For example, working with friends to mine and craft various projects in the game can improve teamwork skills and the previously mentioned freedom to build anything works on a child’s creative skills. Also, encouraging your child to take the time to think and plan out a project before building can improve project management skills.

And don’t forget! You, as a parent, can also get involved and use Minecraft as a family bonding activity.
I hope this brief overview of Minecraft has answered any questions you might have about the game. If you have additional questions, I encourage you to take a look at the Minecraft website or search YouTube for Minecraft videos – they’re a great resource for getting a first-hand look at what this game has to offer.

Meet Emagination’s New Director of Curriculum Development
glen Please join us in welcoming Glen Whelden to our corporate team! Glen has come on board to be our new Director of Curriculum Development and we’re very excited to have him.

Glen provides a wealth of knowledge in all areas of the Media and Entertainment industry. He has more than 20 years of experience as a Lead Designer and has worked extensively with major companies both in the U.S. and Canada, as a Production Artist, Curriculum Designer, Technical Trainer and Consultant. He holds a B.Sc. in Computer Science from the University of New Hampshire.

Glen is also an Autodesk Certified Instructor, Certified 3dsmax Professional, and a Certified Maya Professional. In 2015, he began authoring the global 3ds Max Certification test for Autodesk, and has co-authored Ascent’s courseware entitled “Autodesk 3ds Max Design Fundamentals” since 2010.

His experience in the industry has led to a comprehensive understanding of 3D modeling, motion graphics, animation, and programming for games and CAD.

He joins Emagination Computer Camps ready to challenge young minds and prepare them for a career in the industry.

5 Women in Tech who Changed the World

With the current push by the tech industry to encourage more young women to consider studying for and working in STEM – science, technology, engineering, and mathematics – career fields, we wanted to celebrate International Women’s Day this year by highlighting five women in tech who changed the world for the better.

Ada Lovelace
Ada Lovelace
No list about women in tech would be complete without Ada Lovelace. She even has her own day dedicated to her (you can read our article about that right here). Ada Lovelace is commonly referred to as the first computer programmer, which is interesting because computers didn’t even exist when she was alive!

In 1843 Ada was employed by Charles Babbage, an English mathematician, philosopher, inventor, and mechanical engineer, who was working on his idea for an invention called the Analytical Engine – a machine designed to count Bernoulli numbers. It was within her notes that she had recorded what would later be recognizes as the first algorithm intended to be carried out by a machine, also known as the first computer algorithm and what would become the foundation for modern computing.

Hedy Lamarr
Hedy Lamarr
Hedy Lamarr, born Hedwig Eva Kiesler, was an Austrian actress who shot to stardom in the 1930’s and 1940’s for her role in movies such as “Samson and Delilah”, “Ecstasy,” and “The Strange Woman,” and she is even referred to by many critics and fans alike as the most beautiful woman to ever appear in films. However, it was during World War II that she proved to be more than just a pretty face.

Along with George Antheil – an American composer, pianist, author, and inventor – Lamarr played a pivotal role in the invention of frequency hopping, a method of sending radio signals from different frequency channels. The duo originally invented this technology to help the U.S. Navy remotely control torpedoes, however, despite receiving two patents and multiple lobbying and fundraising efforts, the Navy ultimately decided not to pursue the technology.

It found new life in the 1950’s from engineers at Sylvania Electronic Systems as an early form of encryption technology as they realized that the randomized channel switching made it difficult for outside users to understand what was being communicated and was promptly integrated into military communication devices.
Despite being invented more than 70 years ago, her invention has made a significant contribution to today’s technology in the form of wireless security as it still plays as integral role in technologies such as Bluetooth and Wi-Fi.

Radia Joy Perlman
Radia Perlman
Radia Joy Perlman, also known as the Mother of the Internet, is a network engineer who developed a computer protocol known as Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) which made it possible to build extensive networks over Ethernet connections. It’s because of this network that we can surf the internet and its seemingly infinite sources of information from the comfort of our home.

More impressively, she is currently working at Intel and recently developed the Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL), which is a new standard for data center connectivity that could very well replace the STP.

Marissa Mayer
Marissa Mayer
Have you ever gone somewhere and asked yourself ”What is there to do around here?” Or have you ever made plans to go on a road trip to visit friends who live in another state or across the country? Chances are you’ve done one of these things at least once and chances are when looking for that local attraction or planning that road trip you did what most people do: you Googled it.

Simple, right? You can thank Marissa Mayer for that! Marissa is Google’s first female engineer who started with the tech giant back when it was a startup in 1999. She currently still works with Google as vice president of location and local services and leads project management and engineering for some of the search engine’s top services including Google Maps, Local Search, Google Earth, and Street view.

The ENIAC Programmers
ENIAC Women
Ok, so putting this group of women on the list puts the grand total of women who changed the world up to 10, but hey, who’s counting? The Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer, or ENIAC, was the first electronic general-purpose computer which was designed to calculate artillery firing tables for the U.S. Army during World War II.

This powerful new tool was primarily programmed by these six women: Kay McNulty, Betty Jennings, Betty Snyder, Marlyn Wescoff, Fran Bilas, and Ruth Lichterman and stayed in operation until 1955. Unfortunately, when the computer was introduced to the public in 1946 these women were never given the credit they deserve for its creation because the public was more interested in the machine than the people behind it.

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